Alcoholics Anonymous Overview support-groups

Alcoholics Anonymous And The Beginning


The community of Alcoholics Anonymous has been providing great support and healing for recovering alcoholics for nearly 80 years. Alcoholics Anonymous provides moral support to people that are trying to stop alcoholism and it started its operation in 1935. 12 steps were developed by the pair to go on the meetings of AA. They later also introduced the 12 traditions further to help define the purpose within the group. The original 12 steps are still intact; besides, many former alcohol addicts contribute to the group by helping the members make steps to recovery.


There are over 50,000 recovering alcoholics that are part of Alcoholics Anonymous group in the country and over 2 million around the globe.


What To Expect From Attending An AA Meeting

For first timers, getting the courage to go to an AA meeting may pose a challenge. Opening up about your condition to people that you have just met is always the hard part for the new members. Fortunately, every participant within AA is fully aware about how the other feels. The founders of the AA were themselves alcoholics and the groups follow the original model to this day. Everybody who is involved in AA activity has been its attendee before, which creates a unique feeling of solidarity and mutual understanding among the addicts.


New members are made to feel comfortable New attendees are encouraged to join the discussion, but it is not required. AA has the understanding that a number of people cannot be comfortable with sharing their intimate details during the initial visits to the organisation. As time passes by most attendees become comfortable with the great healing and therapy, they receive through the open and honest discussions which are provided by these meetings.


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Difference Between Closed And Open Meetings

A closed AA meeting is attended only by recovering alcoholic addicts or those seeking to know how to go about kicking the habit.

On the other hand, friends, spouses and family members are welcome to attend open meetings. You may choose the type of meeting you feel comfortable attending. For some people, it is preferable to separate their normal lives from their recovery. However, some people recover faster when their families and friends are near them.


The 12 Stages

The 12 steps which originated from Alcoholics Anonymous are presently the standards which are applied by all addiction recovery groups. It involves following one stage t the next throughout the whole recovery process. Steps may be revisited several times until the member comes to grips with that stage of their recovery process.

The first step includes admitting that you have a problem, and really need help to solve it. Making yourself a promise that you'll recovery from the addiction, accepting your mistakes and the wrongs you have done to others are some of the stages that you must go through in the process. Here is ore information about the 12 stages of recovery.


Objections To AA

It is normal for a person to try and find reasons not to attend the meetings especially if they don't feel comfortable yet. Some of their common objections are the following

  • They don't see if they'll get the assistance they need
  • They fear running into a person who knows them
  • They haven't seen their alcoholism as a problem yet

Knowing the main objective of attending the meeting will help you overcome some of these excuses and recover from your addiction.

The bottom line out here is that if you feel there is a problem you are probably right. Attending a meeting can possibly save you from years of heartache caused by your alcoholism it can in no way be harmful.


Looking For An Alcoholics Anonymous Group

No matter where you live, there certainly is an AA group nearby. The meetings held many times so you can catch the next one soon. Make up your mind what kind of group you want to join, closed or open, then go through our online meeting finder to locate one near you. Let us provide you the help to find an AA group today please contact 0800 246 1509.